Structural engineers are trying to work out how long Nottingham train station repairs will take

This post first appeared on Nottingham Post. Read the original article.

Engineers were today combing through Nottingham railway station to assess the true extent of the damage caused by Friday’s huge fire.

But the owners say it could be a while before the timescale to put things right becomes clear.

This is despite the station being open again for travel within 24 hours of the alarm being raised.

Repair, rebuild and renovation work will be undertaken by the station’s owners, Network Rail.

The main concourse at Nottingham railway station

The main concourse at Nottingham railway station

Structural engineers are on site trying to get a clearer picture of what will need to be done. But it is likely to be Monday before any more details about the time involved emerge.

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Network Rail spokeswoman Rachel Lowe said: “The priority is the emergency services investigation - by the fire service, on the nature of how it spread, and the police, over how it started.

“Structural engineers are working hard to understand what it has done to the station and what it means in terms of lessons we need to learn, but it’s far too early to say.

“The building is still standing – we have got something to work on. We are in the process of understanding how we can get it back to what it used to be.”

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Fire at Nottingham railway station

The fire is believed to have started in a toilet near the main entrance before spreading through the roof space in what fire officers have called the most complex blaze they have seen in over 20 years.

The Grade II* listed part of the building, built in 1848, was left unscathed with damage mostly confined to the areas extended four years ago in a £50m refit.

Smoke damage can be seen on this overbridge

Smoke damage can be seen on this overbridge.

Network Rail owns all the structure and infrastructure, because rail operating franchises only last a few years and some continuity in ownership is required.

The buildings are dealt with on a landlord and tenant basis. This means minor upkeep is dealt with by East Midlands Trains, which manages the station, while structural building repairs would be taken on by Network Rail.

During the revamp the main entrance and booking hall was updated and a new ticket office created, along with an escalator, new toilets and shops.

The cause of the blaze is being investigated as a potential arson - and public fondness for the station has been voiced on social media.

Rachel said: “Their concern is shared because of a lot of the people here are teams who worked on it to make it into the lovely station it turned out to be after the renovation.

“The fact it opened the next day is testament to the great work of the emergency services for getting it under control; and the police for doing what they needed to do so they could hand the premises back to us so quickly.”